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  • #16
    Welding the brackets onto a 8.8 wouldn’t take that much and I’m sure there are a few guys in here that would be willing to help other Club members in doing that. I can weld good enough but I’m not a certified welder. But I’ve never broken one of my welds after I was done. (Sure it will happen eventually) but the good thing about metal is you can always(almost) grind and cut it back off and weld it again.
    03 TJ X 4.0l std 3.5” Rock Krawler lift w/ adj short arms, 1.25" body lift, QD sway bar links. Rubicon Express trac bars. 1.5" wheel spacers w/ factory 15x8 w/35x12.5R15 BFGs KM2 M/Ts. Custom built rear bumper & tire swing. Poison Spyder ft bumper, Rock Sliders, & Hood Louvers, Drake hood latches, D44s w/ factory lockers w/4.88 gears Synergy Mfg sleeves, C-guests, & OTK steering using JCR & Ruff Stuff Specialties 1 ton steering, rebuilt NP231 w/ 2low kit, JB Conversions wide chain kit, & SYE kit

    Comment


    • sjlplat
      sjlplat commented
      Editing a comment
      I picked up a little flux core welder on trade years ago, and I never learned how to use it. I had a buddy use it to weld up a 1/4" belly skid on my old crawler, and it worked just fine. I'd feel pretty good about welding something non-critical, but suspension would definitely be out of my comfort zone -- even if it is just a spring pad.

  • #17
    CDE I see your comment about the 8.8 and needing something bolt in over a weekend. I have built a few 8.8's with gears,lockers and other parts. it would be simple to rebuild everything and weld on brackets and bolt it in on one Saturday.

    Comment


    • CDE
      CDE commented
      Editing a comment
      ZacT Good to know. I just figured there were too many things that could possibly go wrong, or unaccounted for, and leave me without a Jeep for awhile.

    • CDE
      CDE commented
      Editing a comment
      But first I need to get rid of the rest of this Rough Country junk. Thinking Currie adjustable control arms next...which I would probably need anyway for the 8.8 swap.

    • sjlplat
      sjlplat commented
      Editing a comment
      Nah, it's pretty straightforward. You can take your measurements for pinion angle and mounts without removing the old axle. Build it first, then do the swap. Actual downtime for the Jeep is a couple hours.

  • #18
    CDE exactly what sjlplat said. very simple to do. However I like having adjustable control arms for the fine tuning aspect of things but can be done with out.

    Comment


    • CDE
      CDE commented
      Editing a comment
      ZacT would you recommend SYE first?

    • ZacT
      ZacT commented
      Editing a comment
      CDE yes you do need a SYE for your TJ. Advanced adapters makes a good one and Teraflex. I ran the Teraflex super short SYE with the VSS sensor and Jet Accutune speed adjuster when I ran a 231. I like the teraflex so you do not have to change speed gears every time you change tire size and gear ratio. Very simple install if you need help.

    • sjlplat
      sjlplat commented
      Editing a comment
      You can also do a hack & tap if you're on a budget. It's not as strong as a full kit, but it doesn't really need to be if you're running a stock drivetrain. You can do it without removing the t-case, which is a small plus.

  • #19
    sjlplat the hack and tap does work well with the proper tools. I have done it to a np208 in a k5. There was no SYE for the 208 at that time. The only problem with tapping is using the proper tooling. The output shafts are hardened steel and tapping can be difficult. The other down side is you get one chance to get it right and if you break off cheap taps you will have to replace the output shaft. I prefer the kit so I can disassemble the case and inspect bearings and parts. I also like to clean the oil pump pick up so everything is fresh.
    Chris if you decide you would like to do your own version of a SYE let me know. I have an old 231 output shaft in my shop. I can send it to my machine shop and have it cut true and tapped straight.
    Also SYE output use a large nut and threads vs the hack and tap that would use a small bolt to hold the yoke on. I know the splines hold the load.
    You also have to use quite a bit of RTV and a large washer to help seal the splines from fluid leaking.
    So many variables at play but I like the challenge.

    Comment


    • CDE
      CDE commented
      Editing a comment
      ZacT I'll probably go with a kit and Tom Woods shaft. Just need to make it to the next paycheck first. We talked about a possible Longview wrench day at the cruise-in last night, but never decided on a date that was good for everyone (main goal is a lift install for @hyperdave). Maybe I can get the SYE knocked out then.

    • sjlplat
      sjlplat commented
      Editing a comment
      Yea, I like the idea of breaking it open and inspecting everything; plus you get a stronger shaft with the kit.

      Bear in mind, it's a good idea to wait on a driveshaft until everything has been installed. You can probably get away with ordering the shaft if you already know the lift height, rear axle, and yoke style, but you'll have a far lower chance of a problem popping up if you can wait.

    • RoRo72
      RoRo72 commented
      Editing a comment
      CDE We can set a wrench day for your project since HyperDave holding things up. lol

  • #20
    Hey, CDE! I just found you a D44. Better go grab it!

    97-06 Wrangler complete Dana 44 axle assembly with 3:73 gears and is an open carrier. Guaranteed to have no noise or play. Brakes seemed to be in good shape but we do not guarantee wear items since these parts are subjective. The housing only had surface rust and no rot. Was not in an accident. Fits all 1997-2006 TJ Wranglers. Please contact us for a freight quote. It is much cheaper if it is going to a business or a freight hub near you.
    - 1988 XJ Base - I don't actually drive it. It just sits in the driveway while I throw parts at it.

    - 1990 XJ Laredo - Old and busted, but it'll get the job done!

    - 1994 XJ Base 2-door - Where'd the other doors go?

    - 1996 XJ Sport - It's red. What else can I say?

    - 1997 XJ Country - My wife wanted something "pretty".

    - 1998 XJ Limited - Cheap and leathery.

    Comment


    • CDE
      CDE commented
      Editing a comment
      Haha thx for looking out. I'm hoping to find one with disc brakes though.

    • sjlplat
      sjlplat commented
      Editing a comment
      Brakes would be relatively easy to swap. I'm planning to do a ZJ disc conversion on my 8.25 before I drop it in.

  • #21
    Well, after weeks of troubleshooting to work out all the gremlins, I think I've finally got this thing in decent running order. When I bought it, I was experiencing 'bucking' issues on the highway, and intermittent no-start issues after warming up. So far, I've replaced most of the common trouble components.
    • Throttle Position Sensor
    • Idle Air Controller
    • O2 Sensor
    • Crank Position Sensor
    • Distributor Cap & Rotor
    • Spark Plug Wires
    • Fuel Pump Relay
    Originally I thought the TPS and IAC would be the most likely culprits, and a subsequent test of the TPS revealed that it was indeed out of spec. Further investigation revealed stripped threads in the throttle body, which is why that was replaced with a new 60mm unit.

    Once the throttle body, TPS, and IAC were replaced, I noticed no improvement in the bucking or no-start issues, so I started looking at the ignition system. This revealed corrosion on the distributor cap contacts and spark plug wires, so I replaced the cap, rotor, and wires. I purchased new plugs, but they did not need to be replaced.

    Once the ignition was tuned up, the bucking issue was resolved, but the no-start condition continued to give me grief. At this point, I replaced the CKS and noticed no improvement. I placed an order for a new MAP sensor, MAT sensor, and battery terminals, and turned to troubleshooting electrical.

    After about an hour of starting, restarting, waiting, checking vacuum lines, checking ground contacts, checking fuses, checking relays, and listening, I noticed a trend: The no start condition wasn't related to heat. Each time the no-start condition existed, I wasn't able to hear the fuel pump. After a 2-3 minute wait, the fuel pump would turn back on. This led me to the fuel pump relay. Pulling the relay and cranking the engine resulted in the exact same symptom I saw with the no-start condition, so I swapped the fuel pump relay with the AC blower motor relay.

    So far, everything appears to be in working order. No other gremlins to speak of. I still have a few things on the way, and I'll install them as they arrive, keeping the originals as spares.

    On-Order:
    • Manifold Temperature Sensor
    • Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor
    • Battery Terminals
    Next Up: Lots of cleaning, and much more interesting mods!
    - 1988 XJ Base - I don't actually drive it. It just sits in the driveway while I throw parts at it.

    - 1990 XJ Laredo - Old and busted, but it'll get the job done!

    - 1994 XJ Base 2-door - Where'd the other doors go?

    - 1996 XJ Sport - It's red. What else can I say?

    - 1997 XJ Country - My wife wanted something "pretty".

    - 1998 XJ Limited - Cheap and leathery.

    Comment


    • WJ_Guy
      WJ_Guy commented
      Editing a comment
      Nice troubleshooting! You have the patience of Job.

    • sjlplat
      sjlplat commented
      Editing a comment
      That's a nice way of putting it. Most people call it paranoia! I refuse to drive anything on the trail that isn't 100% reliable.

      Still have a low idle issue, but it doesn't appear to affect driveability. I'm thinking the TPS might still need some adjusting after replacing most of the intake. Replaced all the relays today -- They looked like they were 30-years old.

  • #22
    Installed a new EGR valve, vacuum harnesses, PCV valve, and temperature sensor. Still has a low idle, but starts right up and runs smooth. I'm noticing a very slight miss that I haven't quite put my finger on; I'll be moving on to the fuel system next.

    Seems to have the typical Renix overheating issue, which I discovered after replacing the temp sensor -- thinking I probably introduced some air into the cooling system. Also noticed the electric auxiliary fan isn't switching on at temp, so I still have some work to do there.

    Lots of regular maintenance stuff still going in, but it's coming along.

    Next Up:
    • EGR solenoid (if I can find one!)
    • Fan relay
    • Injectors - Bosch 746's out of a Volvo
    • Fuel regulator
    Edit: Tested the fan and relay, and both are good. Looks like another sensor to be replaced - coolant temperature sensor appears to be the culprit.
    Last edited by sjlplat; 03-10-2018, 11:34 AM.
    - 1988 XJ Base - I don't actually drive it. It just sits in the driveway while I throw parts at it.

    - 1990 XJ Laredo - Old and busted, but it'll get the job done!

    - 1994 XJ Base 2-door - Where'd the other doors go?

    - 1996 XJ Sport - It's red. What else can I say?

    - 1997 XJ Country - My wife wanted something "pretty".

    - 1998 XJ Limited - Cheap and leathery.

    Comment


    • #23
      Today I drove to Paris, TX to buy a parts rig. This is a 1990 2wd Laredo.

      The good:
      • It was $500 bucks.
      • The body is straight.
      • Interior and exterior colors match my '88.
      • It has a lot of usable parts, including the desirable Laredo interior.
      • It starts and runs smooth.
      The bad:
      • The driver seat has some tears.
      • The engine is caked with oil.
      • The radiator is shot - it looks like it was gouged by the fan.
      • The fan assembly has been removed.
      • The transmission slips.
      • The vacuum harness is a mess.
      • It looks to have some wiring problems.
      • It's filled with used cigarette butts.
      • The tires are as smooth as a baby's butt.
      It's in rough shape, but there are a lot of good parts that can be used, and I think I can bring it back to life; maybe as a 2nd rig for my wife. She says she'd like to have an overland-style flat black zombie Jeep, and she doesn't need 4wd (though it might be worth converting since I'm swapping my axles and I have to replace the transmission anyways).

      I plan to pull the Laredo interior out of this one and swap it with mine. The passenger and rear seats are in great shape, but the driver seat has some tears. I may end up having to re-upholster all of them, but these Laredos are much more cushy than the base model.

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      Last edited by sjlplat; 03-11-2018, 10:31 PM.
      - 1988 XJ Base - I don't actually drive it. It just sits in the driveway while I throw parts at it.

      - 1990 XJ Laredo - Old and busted, but it'll get the job done!

      - 1994 XJ Base 2-door - Where'd the other doors go?

      - 1996 XJ Sport - It's red. What else can I say?

      - 1997 XJ Country - My wife wanted something "pretty".

      - 1998 XJ Limited - Cheap and leathery.

      Comment


      • WJ_Guy
        WJ_Guy commented
        Editing a comment
        That interior reminds me of m '88 Comanche. I miss that rig....

      • sjlplat
        sjlplat commented
        Editing a comment
        I really dig the front seats. Thick side bolsters and unique headrests. After looking at a '90 Limited, I'm thinking grey leather would be slick. I'll probably call around to some upholstery shops to see what they can do with these.

    • #24
      Made a little more progress on routine maintenance and gremlin hunting today.

      After watching a few YouTube videos and fiddling with the A/C compressor and low pressure switch, I realized that the A/C low pressure switch is preventing the auxiliary fan from switching on. By jumping the low pressure switch and turning on the A/C, I was able to get the auxiliary fan to turn on immediately along with the A/C compressor clutch. Fortunately the system has already been converted to R134A, so I've ordered a recharge hose, oil, sealant, and refrigerant to recharge the system. I've got some concerns that the system is leaking after the conversion, but I'll tackle that if/when it rears up.

      I also swapped over the first part from the Laredo: drum-roll *** A fancy new trip meter button! Hey, it's the little details that count, right?

      Coming up next:
      • New window seals for all 4 doors have arrived.
      • Bosch 746 injectors arrive tomorrow.
      • A/C recharge parts arrive Tuesday.
      Last edited by sjlplat; 03-25-2018, 09:40 PM.
      - 1988 XJ Base - I don't actually drive it. It just sits in the driveway while I throw parts at it.

      - 1990 XJ Laredo - Old and busted, but it'll get the job done!

      - 1994 XJ Base 2-door - Where'd the other doors go?

      - 1996 XJ Sport - It's red. What else can I say?

      - 1997 XJ Country - My wife wanted something "pretty".

      - 1998 XJ Limited - Cheap and leathery.

      Comment


      • #25
        One step at a time. You'll get it there.
        1990 Jeep Yj, 4bt Cummins Turbo Diesel, M5ODR2 5 speed trans, NP205 T-case, Ford 8.8 rear w/ ARB air locker, Waggy D44 front w/ ARB air locker, 35x12.5x15 KM2, Warn winch, 2.5" Rubicon Express lift, DIY highline fenders, TJ Flares, DIY rock sliders and skid plate, ARB dual air compressor.

        Comment


        • #26
          New injectors are installed!

          This was a relatively uneventful install. Old injectors are out, and new injectors are in. After re-installing the fuel rail and re-connecting all the vacuum lines and sensors, I primed the fuel rail and it fired right up. Seems to idle smooth, and throttle response seems slightly improved. Unfortunately, I was unable to test drive it because I discovered a leak from the fuel pressure regulator. Upon further inspection, it appears that the o-ring had a slight tear in it. I'm sure it was torn during the removal or re-install of the fuel rail, as it wasn't leaking before the swap.

          New fuel regulator o-rings are on-order, and I'll take it for a test drive once the leak is fixed.

          Here are the injectors installed in the fuel rail.





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          Old 1-hole injectors

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          New 4-hole injectors

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          - 1988 XJ Base - I don't actually drive it. It just sits in the driveway while I throw parts at it.

          - 1990 XJ Laredo - Old and busted, but it'll get the job done!

          - 1994 XJ Base 2-door - Where'd the other doors go?

          - 1996 XJ Sport - It's red. What else can I say?

          - 1997 XJ Country - My wife wanted something "pretty".

          - 1998 XJ Limited - Cheap and leathery.

          Comment


          • denverd1
            denverd1 commented
            Editing a comment
            Bosch injectors? yep! (below)

          • sjlplat
            sjlplat commented
            Editing a comment
            There appears to be a lot of misinformation out there about which injectors to use on which model year. The previous owner told me he had installed Bosch 703's out of a Neon because they were recommended on a lot of forums. He complained about it running lean with the 703's, so he re-installed the original Siemens injectors.

            After lots and lots of reading, I've discovered that the 703's are not recommended for Renix engines for this very reason, and the 746's offer much better performance. So far, I have to say the 746's were the right choice.

        • #27
          I'm definitely no videographer, but I think I've got the A/C back in working order, the auxiliary fan running, and idle appears to be more stable. Not sure what it means, but running the A/C stabilizes the idle right where it needs to be.

          - 1988 XJ Base - I don't actually drive it. It just sits in the driveway while I throw parts at it.

          - 1990 XJ Laredo - Old and busted, but it'll get the job done!

          - 1994 XJ Base 2-door - Where'd the other doors go?

          - 1996 XJ Sport - It's red. What else can I say?

          - 1997 XJ Country - My wife wanted something "pretty".

          - 1998 XJ Limited - Cheap and leathery.

          Comment


          • #28
            What injectors did you use?

            Comment


          • #29
            A/C Gremlins

            Took the XJ for a test drive yesterday, and the A/C was blowing ambient air temps again, so it's definitely leaking all the refrigerant out of the system. My best guess is that a previous owner installed the recharge adapters, but probably didn't replace anything else. This will have to be a little larger-scale project to properly convert over to R134A.

            I'm not familiar with A/C systems at all, so I've been reading up on all the components. As far as I can tell, I should be able to evacuate all the old oil and moisture with a vacuum pump, replace all the o-rings, replace a handful of critical components, then recharge with R134A.

            Parts to replace:
            • Receiver-Drier
            • Expansion Valve
            • O-Rings
            Transmission Shift Point Gremlins

            After swapping in the new fuel injectors and fuel regulator, the transmission started shifting too early. I had already replaced the TPS (albeit with a cheap Chinese replacement), so I ordered a better quality TPS replacement and started checking electrical connections. Fuses and relays were good, and all connections were properly re-attached so I went back to the TPS and tested it, knowing this was a common problem area, even with new sensors.

            The first step in testing a TPS sensor on a Renix Jeep is to measure the resistance at the TPS output while wiggling the main engine harness at the valve cover and at the firewall. If resistance fluctuates less than 1-ohm, the harness is considered "OK". When I swapped the TPS the first time, the harness was fine; but this time the meter jumped all over the map.

            With the harness being suspect, I moved on to the sensor ground upgrade mod outlined in Cruiser's Renix Tips, and replaced the TPS again. Once this was done, the shifting was back to normal. Given the problem here, I'll probably move on to the C101 elimination mod to address some of the other known electrical problems on Renix-era Jeeps.
            Last edited by sjlplat; 03-31-2018, 08:48 PM.
            - 1988 XJ Base - I don't actually drive it. It just sits in the driveway while I throw parts at it.

            - 1990 XJ Laredo - Old and busted, but it'll get the job done!

            - 1994 XJ Base 2-door - Where'd the other doors go?

            - 1996 XJ Sport - It's red. What else can I say?

            - 1997 XJ Country - My wife wanted something "pretty".

            - 1998 XJ Limited - Cheap and leathery.

            Comment


            • denverd1
              denverd1 commented
              Editing a comment
              nice work! cruiser's writeup is great

            • sjlplat
              sjlplat commented
              Editing a comment
              Yea, I've gotta admit -- Just looking at the connections, I thought everything looked fine. No corrosion on the contacts to speak of, and good snug contact everywhere I look. Nevertheless, every time I walk through one of those tips and follow his instructions, Cruiser is dead-on!

          • #30
            DirtDogs Offroad Pod Light Mount and Reverse Lights

            This was an impulse buy after I saw the mount posted on Facebook. It's a pretty slick design, and was on sale for 10% off.



            Priming & Painting
            The mount came bare-metal, so I applied primer and a few coats of flat black paint when it arrived.



            Mounting & Wiring
            Mounting is straight-forward. It mounts directly to the factory license plate holes.

            I opted to wire the lights in to my reverse lamps, so wiring was a little tricky. The connections are simple enough, but fishing the wires through the fiberglass hatch was a bit of a challenge. I wanted to run the wires through the factory loom, but the loom is riveted to the roof and the hatch.

            I had some concerns that drilling out the rivets might create some problems with the fiberglass hatch, so I decided to drill a new hole inside of the hatch seal. After fishing for awhile, I realized that there were some additional support plates inside of the shell that I would not be able to fish around, so I drilled a second hole as close to the interior panel as possible, hoping the panel would hide the hole and the wires.




            I drilled 2 additional holes through the hatch on each side of the license plate lamp, and zip-tied the wires to the factory harness inside of the hatch. These were then spliced in to the passenger-side reverse lamp. The LED's don't draw a lot of amperage, so I feel relatively safe powering them from the factory wiring. However, future plans include a distribution block in the rear, so these will eventually be re-wired to the distribution block with a relay to the reverse lights and a bypass switch for peace of mind.



            The Final Product
            All-in-all, I'm pretty pleased with the finished product. These pod lights are clearly an improvement over the old factory reverse bulbs.



            Coming Up
            • Replace wire nuts with solder and heat shrink.
            • Polish up the install with rubber grommets and split loom.
            • Install a distribution block in the rear for additional accessories.
            Last edited by sjlplat; 05-09-2018, 09:18 PM.
            - 1988 XJ Base - I don't actually drive it. It just sits in the driveway while I throw parts at it.

            - 1990 XJ Laredo - Old and busted, but it'll get the job done!

            - 1994 XJ Base 2-door - Where'd the other doors go?

            - 1996 XJ Sport - It's red. What else can I say?

            - 1997 XJ Country - My wife wanted something "pretty".

            - 1998 XJ Limited - Cheap and leathery.

            Comment


            • denverd1
              denverd1 commented
              Editing a comment
              Shouldn't have any problem with stock wiring. Amp draw is low like the last round of a limbo

            • sjlplat
              sjlplat commented
              Editing a comment
              Yea, I think it's probably fine, but this is a Renix XJ. These things are notorious for wiring problems -- lots of bad splices and sub-par wire gauge throughout. The wires I spliced into looked to be around 20-gauge, and I measured 9-volts at the rear of the rig, so there are definitely some issues somewhere in the middle.
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